Pathlight Investors’ Top Recommended Reads - May 2014

  • Posted on: 9 December 2015
  • By: admin

Ready for some more great articles?  Here's our picks for May 2014:  

 
Mortgage demand slumps – mortgage demand fell to the lowest level in 14 years as refinancing demand slumped sharply (originations totaled $235B, down 58% Y/Y and 23% Q/Q).  “Softness in the housing market, if it deepens and undermines the broader economic outlook, could complicate the Fed's efforts to dial back easy-money policies designed to support the recovery” – WSJ   http://goo.gl/BY8A0T  

 

Wages + the Fed – “Don’t Look Now, but Rising Wages Could Spell Trouble for the Fed” – from the WSJ - “After a torturously long wait since the 2008-2009 crisis, this gloomy U.S. labor market is finally improving. There are clear, albeit early, signs of wage growth for most workers. And while that’s a positive development for Americans in general, we must warn one especially pessimistic breed of American – fixed-income investors – that it means market rates could head sharply higher in the months ahead” http://goo.gl/hAcU3x

 

Net Neutrality:  The FCC plans to propose Thurs new open Internet rules that would allow content companies to pay ISPs for special access to consumers.  The proposed rules would prevent ISPs from discriminating against specific websites, but would allow ISPs to give some preferential treatment on "commercially reasonable" terms.  The proposal does not address the separate issue of back-end interconnection or peering between content providers and broadband networks. http://goo.gl/1A7Ppd    

 

Washington grows nervous about student debt forgiveness plans; some within the government are worried about the rising liability attached to student loan forgiveness programs and wonder whether the aid plans are causing colleges to raise tuitions well beyond the rate of inflation – WSJ    http://goo.gl/MrTvyA    

 

US economic recovery has been sluggish but prob. has more room to run; the recovery has been among the longest on record but has been tepid by historical standards.  Many key metrics have a lot more room to go before fully normalizing.  WSJ  http://goo.gl/D9bNQB   

 

And On A Lighter Note…

 

Giant pile of dirt upsetting people: http://goo.gl/di3MvH